Blog

Displaying: 1 - 10 of 13

  |  

Show All

  |

[1]

2 Next

Exhibition Schedule

March 27th, 2016

Exhibition Schedule

Juried and Invitational Exhibits

AWS American Watercolor Society
Salmagundi Club, NYC, April 4-23, 2016
Qualified for Signature Status
"Breakfast with Tiffanys" will receive the Fred E Albrecht Award
and is included in the 2016-17 AWS Travel Exhibition

AWS 2015-16 Travel Exhibition
Sacramento Fine Arts Center, Carmichael, CA Feb 20 - April 9, 2016
"Nine Bicycles"

TWSA Transparent Watercolor Society of America
Kenosha Public Museum, Kenosha WI, May 7 - Aug 7th, 2016
Qualified for Signature Status
"Parade Day"

Southern Watercolor Society
Pryor Gallery, Columbia TN May 9 - June 28, 2016
"The Sky's the Limit"

WAS-H Watercolor Art Society-Houston International
WAS-H Gallery, Houston TX, March 8-31, 2016
"The Artisan"

Outside Inspiration: Kris Parins Solo Exhibit
Lexow Gallery, Sarasota FL, March 6-30, 2016
25 Original Paintings in Watercolor

Art Center Manatee: Member Show and Florida Life
Bradenton FL, March 28 - April 22, 2016
"Empire State", "June Tune", "Conveyance"

FSWS Florida Suncoast Watercolor Society
Dunedin Fine Art Center, Dunedin FL, Mar 11 - Apr 17, 2016
"Lake Garden" and "Quiet River"

VAC Exhibit Juror
Visual Art Center, Punta Gorda FL Apr 1, 2016
Juror of selection and awards

Resume

March 4th, 2015

Resume

Selected Juried and Invitational Exhibits:

American Watercolor Society Travel Exhibition 2015-16
American Watercolor Society Annual Exhibition, New York, NY '13, '15
Birds in Art International Exhibition, Woodson Art Museum, Wausau WI 2014
World Watermedia Exposition, Bangkok,Thailand 2014
Watercolor West International Exhibition, Brea, CA 2014
National Biennial Art Exhibition, Punta Gorda FL 2014
Southern Watercolor Society Annual Exhibition '08, '10, '11, '12, 14
Solo Exhibit, Longboat Key Center for the Arts, FL 2014
National Watercolor Society Annual Exhibition, San Pedro, CA '12, '13, '14
National Watercolor Society Traveling Exhibition 2013
Florida Watercolor Society Annual Exhibition FL '06, '09, '11, '12, '13, '14
Florida Watercolor Society Traveling Exhibition '13, '14
Artists of the Myakka, Longboat Key, FL 2012
Fine Art Society of Sarasota Gallery Tour 2012
Artists of the New North, Bergstrom-Mahler Museum, Neenah WI 2011
Transparent Watercolor Society of America Annual Exhibition '08, '10
National Watercolor Society All-Member Exhibit San Pedro, CA 2010
Wyoming Watercolor Society National Exhibition Sheridan WY 2007, '08, '09, '10
Featured Artist: Studio at Gulf & Pine Anna Maria Island FL 2010
Solo Exhibit Women's Resource Center, Sarasota FL 2009
The Island and its Beaches, Studio at Gulf & Pine, Anna Maria Island FL 2009
Transparent Exhibit FSWS, Art Center Manatee 2009
Women Contemporary Artists, Anna Maria Island FL 2008
Richeson 75: Figure/Portrait International Competition, Kimberly WI 2008
Landscapes, Joan Peters Gallery, Bradenton FL 2008
Solo Exhibit, Florida West Coast Symphony, Sarasota FL 2007
Transparent Watercolor Annual, Beach Art Center, Indian Rocks Beach FL 2006
Wisconsin Painters & Sculptors, Steenbach Gallery, Madison WI 2005
Watercolor Wisconsin, Wustum Museum of Fine Arts, Racine WI 2004
Northeast WI Art Annual, Neville Public Museum, Green Bay WI 1979, '01, '04
Solo Exhibit, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, W VA 2003
Solo Exhibit, Richard C. Anderson Gallery at Land's End Corporate Offices 2003
Barns & Farms National Exhibition, Barnsite Gallery, Kewaunee WI 2003
Midwest Winter, Center for Visual Arts, Wausau WI 2002


Publications:
"Splash 9, 14, 15, 16: "The Best of Watercolor" North Light Publishing 2006-2015
Cover, American Artist Watercolor magazine, with 10-page article, Spring 2012
Cover, Watercolor Artist Magazine Dec 2011
"Creativity Challenge" authored 3-page article, Watercolor Artist Magazine Dec 2011
Cover, Wisconsin Visual Artists Magazine January 2011
"Ones To Watch" annual article Watercolor Artist Magazine Dec 2010
"From Pixels to Paper" authored 6-page article, Watercolor Artist Magazine Dec 2010
Cover, Farmers Market Today magazine, Winter 2010
Venice Gulf Coast Living Magazine: Featured Artist 2009

Awards:
Florida Suncoast Watercolor Society Aqueous Exhibit: First Place 2012, 2014
Florida Watercolor Society Annual Exhibition: Societies Award 2013
Florida Suncoast Watercolor Society Transparent Exhibit: Second Place 2013
National Watercolor Society Annual Exhibition: Jerry's Award 2012
Southern Watercolor Society Annual Exhibition: Golden Artists Color Award 2012
Florida Suncoast Watercolor Society Signature Exhibit: Third Place 2011
Watercolor Wyoming 24th National Exhibition: Honorable Mention 2009
Watercolor Wyoming 23rd National Exhibition: Second Place 2008
Southern Watercolor Society Annual Exhibition: Winsor Newton Award 2008
Women Contemporary Artists Landscape Exhibit: Third Place 2008
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park: Artist-In-Residence 2003
Wisconsin Arts Board: Artists and Community Collaborations Grant 2002

Collections:
West Bend Mutual Insurance, Jack Richeson, The National Parks, The University of Wisconsin,
Green Bay Public Schools, and many private collections

Affiliations:
National Watercolor Society, Signature Member
Florida Watercolor Society, Signature Member
Southern Watercolor Society, Signature Member
Florida Suncoast Watercolor Society, Signature Member
Wyoming Watercolor Society, Signature Member
American Watercolor Society, Associate Member
Transparent Watercolor Society of America, Associate Member
Watercolor West, Associate Member

Related Experience:
Art Instructor, 2006 - present: Art Association of Jackson Hole WY; Ringling College of Art and Design; Venice Art Center;
Oshkosh Fine Arts Association; Waterloo Watercolor Group (Austin TX) Green Bay WI Area Watercolor Guild; North Port Art Center;
Peninsula School of Art (Door Co. WI); Chippewa Valley WI Arts Association
Co-owner/Co-manager, Lake Gallery, Lakewood WI 2007
Originator & Director, Gallery Days (Art Festival) Lakewood WI 2002-03
Account Executive and Art Director, Arketype, Green Bay WI 1995-98
Art Director, Lawrence University, Appleton WI 1993-95
Art Director, Goltz and Associates, Green Bay WI 1989-93
Owner/Manager, Fiberspace, Green Bay WI 1979-86

Education:
University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, postgraduate studies: graphic design
University of Wisconsin-Madison, B.S. in Related Art

2015 Workshop Schedule

March 4th, 2015

2015 Workshop Schedule

Here is a list of the workshops and demonstrations I have coming up. Be sure to request a supply list when you register for one of my workshops. All of my workshops are geared to intermediate to advanced painters. Please feel free to email me at kris.parins@gmail.com if you have any questions. I look forward to painting with you!

Sarasota, FL
April 13 - 15, 2015, 9 am - 4 pm
Splash, Splatter, & Pour: Watercolor on the Loose
And
Kris Parins Demo Sunday April 12, 1-3 PM
Art Center Sarasota
707 N. Tamiami Tr. Sarasota, FL 34236
http://www.artsarasota.org/parins
Contact: Elizabeth Elizabeth@artsarasota.org
941-365-2032


Green Bay, WI
June 17-19, 2015, 9 am - 4 pm
Splash, Splatter, & Pour FILLED
Northeast Wisconsin Watercolor Society
1825 Riverside Drive, Green Bay WI 54301
http://newiswatercolors.com/workshops.html
$249 members, $284 nonmembers
Contact: Jane Neumann janemneumann@gmail.com

FAQ Pouring Workshop

August 30th, 2014

FAQ Pouring Workshop

What kind of references should I bring?

Bring some images that you are excited about painting. Look for, or sketch, large simple shapes with good value patterns. Your painting plan should have mostly mid to dark values; light subjects require a lot of masking. We'll cover this in the workshop so don't stress out about it, just bring a lot of references.


Can I transfer my drawing or photo to the watercolor paper before the pouring workshop?

No, the transfer process is part of the technique and can't be done in advance. It's OK to enlarge a photo to the size of the painting (on regular printer paper, not photo paper) but not necessary before hearing my spiel and making an informed decision about the most appropriate image to use for pouring. There is usually a quick-print shop nearby for getting enlargements at noon or after class. Of course there is also the old-fashioned drawing by hand method! A full-size drawing (not very detailed) could be made on lightweight paper or tracing paper. I do demo how to transfer to the WC paper.

I prefer that students not get too far ahead of the process, as there are fine points I need to communicate. Not everyone will be prepared in advance anyway, so I start at the beginning with my explanations and demonstration.


What is stretching paper? Should I stretch my paper in advance?

Stretching means soaking and closely stapling the wet paper to a rigid board. (NOT regular foam core; gatorboard is my favorite.) However I will usually bring a supply of rigid watercolor painting surfaces for sale. These are Arches 140# paper adhered to a Canson acid-free board. They still need to be taped to a larger support board, but eliminate the need for the stretching procedure. Students may use either; I'll probably be using the rigid surfaces myself. You can order for yourself at Jerry's Artarama. I have an Instructor's Cart on their site under K for Kris Parins, which contains some of the items on the supply list.

When using watercolor boards in your workshop, is it still necessary to have an additional backing board?

Yes, the support board is needed to keep the surface flat and rigid, as we pick it up and tilt as part of the process. The watercolor board is taped to the support, not stapled.


Is it alright to cut boards to half sheet size?

Pouring works best on a large surface. I prefer a full sheet myself; a half sheet (15 x 22) would be the minimum size. don't chop everything in half right away. You might wish you could try a full sheet.


Can we work on 300lb arches stapled on board?

No to the 300 lb in a workshop; takes too long to dry and soaks up too much pigment. Since we need to stretch paper for pouring anyway, the extra weight of the 300 # is wasted. Feel free to experiment with other surfaces outside the workshop.


How many paintings will we do in the workshop?

In a 3-day workshop, we should have time for starting at least two, maybe three paintings. There will be down time while work-in-progress is drying, so second or third sheets can be stretched then, if need be. Even if students decide to use the rigid surfaces (see above), they should have some watercolor paper scraps on hand for making color wheels and using as testers. I have a fun demo on Day 3 that uses a half sheet of traditional paper.


You mention Incredible White Mask. Can I use Pebeo or frisket tape instead?

NO. Pebeo is only good on unpainted white paper. When applied over a painted surface, as we will be doing, it can be very difficult to remove and often scuffs the painting. I have had the best luck with Incredible White Mask. As for the tape, I believe that the amount of water we use would cause it to leak.

The Workshop Supply List

August 30th, 2014

The Workshop Supply List

You have just spent hundreds of dollars on tuition for a workshop from an artist you admire. You may even have flown in and paid for a hotel for the week. So why would you risk the success of your experience by not bringing the items on the instructor's supply list?

Some art workshop instructors are very general and say "bring what you have." Others will provide unusual art materials for an added supply fee. As a workshop instructor, I have learned to divide my supply list into two categories: "Absolutely Required" and "Nice to Have." My email address is included on the list if my prospective students have any questions. And yet, in nearly every workshop I have taught or attended, participants show up lacking essential items. The student is frustrated because they are not able to follow along, the instructor must take valuable time to figure out alternatives, the other students are annoyed that class time is being wasted . . . and none of this is conducive to a positive learning atmosphere.

If the workshop sponsor does not give you a supply list when you register, be sure to ask if the instructor has one. If there are items on the supply list that are puzzling or unavailable, please contact the instructor for alternative solutions before the workshop. You will increase the enjoyment of the experience, not only for yourself, but for the instructor and other students. Thank you!

International Watercolor Exhibit in Thailand

May 18th, 2014

International Watercolor Exhibit in Thailand

I admit at first I was more than a little skeptical. An email invitation to exhibit in an international exposition? What's the hitch? After checking with a couple of artist acquaintances who exhibit on the world stage, I felt confident enough in the authenticity of the invitation that I decided to take the leap. I sent two of my full-sheet paintings off to a brand-new organization on the other side of the world. Based on the photos on their facebook page, the work arrived on time and in fine shape. (Thank you, USPS!) The organizers will handle the framing.
As I learn more about what's going on in Bangkok I'll add to this post. And if you have any similar experiences, I'd love to hear from you in the comment section!

Gallery Hanging System

March 20th, 2014

It was time to paint, and I don't mean landscapes. Ten years of rearranging artwork had left our living room wall peppered with nail holes. After the time-consuming upheaval of spackling, sanding, and repainting, my dear husband commented, "What would you think of installing a hanging system?"

Yes! We now have an inconspicuous rail running along the ceiling and a simple cable and hook assembly for hanging paintings. Since this long wall also serves as my in-house gallery and art storage, it is wonderful to easily add, remove, and rearrange work without scarring our newly surfaced wall. I recommend a gallery hanging system as a simple and attractive solution for those of you who like to change out your artwork when you move furniture, add to your collection, or just need a new look.

The Power of a Title

October 28th, 2013

The Power of a Title

Coming up with titles for my paintings is something I love to do. It broadens my creative enjoyment and gives me another important avenue for communicating my message to the viewer. However I realize that not every artist relishes that task, as evidenced by the numerous paintings with ho-hum titles such as "Vase of Flowers," or "Lake Shore" or even the nondescript "#57." Okay, I admit to the occasional "Blue Truck" or "Aspen Grove", but at times I have delved deeper to tell a little story with "Elizabeth's Canopy" when a simple "Old Cottonwood" might have sufficed. Doesn't a painting named "The Pilgrimage" arouse your curiosity more than if it had been simply called "The Hike?"

Still not convinced?

First of all, if you have a working title in mind when you begin a piece, it can serve as your mission statement, the Big Idea to help keep your painting on track.

And secondly, when a viewer is looking at a room full of paintings, your clever or insightful title gives him one more reason to pause and consider your artwork. On several occasions, purchasers admitted to me that they were prompted to buy based on their interest in my painting's title.

So even if you don't consider yourself a poet (I certainly don't) reaching beyond the obvious solution just might start a conversation that gives you a deeper connection to your viewers. It's worth the effort!

A Series Hangs Together

October 27th, 2013

A Series Hangs Together

This series looks wonderful when framed together in the frame #444SLT, Top Mat: Arctic White, Bottom Mat: Mist. Print on Somerset Velvet paper to get the closest match to the original paintings.

Painting in a series presents a unique set of creative challenges. A chilly March day in Times Square, NY provided the atmosphere and design inspiration for a collection of reference photos. I knew right away that I would want to make several paintings of the constantly shifting scene. The paintings share a Big Idea: the misty quality of city light as it shafts between the buildings can change an ordinary, familiar scene into something remarkable. Other unifying elements are the hourglass shape of the lightest values and the minimal level of detail of the backlit figures. Additionally, the color palette is consistent for all the paintings, and the same technique (masking and pouring layers) was used throughout the series. Each painting has a unique atmosphere, vantage point, and color emphasis. Creating the paintings in the sequential order of the photo references made me mindful of the time passing with the flow of the crowd. The careful observer will see some of the figures repeated as they move from one captured moment to the next.

Another set of photos from my latest trip to NYC is percolating, and I feel more street scenes are waiting to be painted!

Artists Need to Think Twice About Size

August 14th, 2013

 Artists Need to Think Twice About Size

Back when I was first starting to mat and frame my work, every piece I did was a custom size. I cut my own mats and ordered a custom frame for each painting. While I enjoyed doing my own framing, this level of customization took a lot of time away from painting, was expensive, and did not really add to the quality of my presentation or the price I was able to charge. Then the light bulb went on. Aha! With a little forethought, I am now able to design my compositions to fit standard frames and can use a full sheet of mat board with little or no waste. Example: a quarter sheet painting will fit well in a standard 16 x 20 frame, and four 16 x 20 mats leave no waste when cut from a full 32 x 40 mat board. If you aren't into cutting mats, check out what precut mat sizes are available before you begin painting.

An added benefit is that I can swap paintings in and out of mats and frames as needed, which saves precious storage space. My work now "hangs together" with a unified appearance whenever I am exhibiting several pieces at once. Of course there are always times when a standard size is not appropriate (creative cropping!) or a client commission requires a custom frame. But by starting most of your paintings with a standard size in mind, you can streamline your presentation process and keep your framing costs in line.

 

Displaying: 1 - 10 of 13

  |  

Show All

  |

[1]

2 Next